Holidays in Cambodia – 2017

January 01 International New Year Day
January 07 Victory over Genocide Day
February 11 Meak Bochea Day
March 08 International Women’s Day
April 14, 15, 16 Khmer New Year Day
May 01 International Labor Day
May 10 Visak Bochea Day
May 13, 14, 15 King’s Birthday, Norodom Sihamoni
May 14 Royal Plowing Ceremony
June 01 International Children Day
June 18 King’s Mother Birthday, Norodom Monineath Sihanouk
September 19, 20, 21 Pchum Ben Day
September 24 Constitutional Day
October 15 Commemoration Day of King’s Father, Norodom Sihanouk
October 23 Anniversary of the Paris Peace Accord
October 29 King’s Coronation Day, Norodom Sihamoni
November 02, 03, 04 Water Festival Ceremony
November 09 Independence Day
December 10 International Human Rights Day

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Holidays in Cambodia, 2016

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Religious holidays, UN nominated days, national commemorations – visitors are often confused by unexpected holidays.

Confused by all the unexpected holidays in Cambodia? Booking a journey and wanting to include Pchum Ben?  Here’s an official list of holidays in Cambodia – 2016

January 01 International New Year Day
January 07 Victory over Genocide Day
February 22 Meak Bochea Day
March 08 International Women Day
April 13, 14, 15, 16 Khmer New Year Day
May 01 International Labor Day
May 13, 14, 15 King’s Birthday, Norodom Sihamoni
May 20 Visak Bochea Day
May 24 Royal Plowing Ceremony
June 01 International Children Day
June 18 King’s Mother Birthday, Norodom Monineath Sihanouk
September 24 Constitutional Day
September 30, October 01, 02 (Note, some sources include October 3rd as well.)
Pchum Ben Day – or Ancestors Day
October 15 Commemoration Day of King’s Father, Norodom Sihanouk
October 23 Paris Peace Agreements Day
October 29 King’s Coronation Day, Norodom Sihamoni
November 09 Independence Day
November 13, 14, 15 Water Festival Ceremony
December 10 International Human Rights Day

Poverty porn. It’s not okay.

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Big applause to of the Phnom Penh Post for her article this last week on ‘poverty porn.’ and the murky ethics of poverty fundraising.  She wrote when Weh Yeoh, the director of OIC Cambodia, tweeted the images from an Australian fundraising ad that portrayed young children, Cambodian, as trafficked and homeless. The photos positively rubbed the readers’ noses in the children’s shame.“I’m pretty sure this breaches all kinds of standards around positive portrayal of children,” he wrote.logo_ppp It turned out the children in the adverts were child models, dirtied up and paid to look like victims – and the fundraising agency said the imagery had kickstarted a very successful fundraising campaign. They were angry to be called out by the media, and went on to attack critic via twitter, arguing that donors don’t respond to images of happy, employed children.

On that front I disagree, and I base my opinion on market research I’ve expressly carried out for the charitable sector which tested various children-need-your-help scenarios – without pictures.

But that’s hardly the issue. The main focus of the criticism was about ‘poverty porn’ and the portrayal of disadvantaged children for gain – whether charitable or otherwise.

“The ’80s are calling – they want their pics of fly-covered starving African children back,” wrote Celia Boyd of Phnom Penh’s SHE Investments, on Twitter, in response to the recent advertising.  “Just because it raises money, it doesn’t make it right,” said fellow Australian Leigh Mathews, of Re/Think Orphanage.  (I’m citing the PPP piece here.)

The ethics of how we use images of poverty is a blurry topic. Last week I taught a local high-school class in New Zealand and we discussed just this issue, and Exhibit A were a stack of slides I’d taken – photos of poor people in Cambodia.  Creepy or okay? I asked.

The students were really clear. If I knew the person being photographed, and if I asked for permission – then it was okay. “You have to be respectful.” one student told me.

What about if it was a poor person whom I saw on the street, or near a temple where I was taking photographs?  “Then don’t zoom in on them,” was the answer.

The core principle is respect, privacy and dignity.  I don’t buy that the portrayal of victims, whether actual or made-up, is the right way to go.

Anyone have any thoughts on the issue?

 

 

How safe is Cambodia’s airline?

Below average. The air safety infrastructure lets the ratings down.

Below average. The air safety infrastructure lets the ratings down.

You can find everything on the web, and recently a friend of mine, Dennis Weng, and I were discussing airline safety. He’s a statistician and we were discussing international standards. The conversation led me to the Airline Ratings Website which posts a safety rating out of 7 for every significant airline in the world. Cambodia Angkor Air gets a…er…3 out of 7.

Admittedly the audit was updated as far back as 2009, almost 6 years ago, so things have doubtless improved. What really pulls the safety rating downward is the poor Cambodian infrastructure. Should a plane go down there is inadequate air accident investigation resource, and as it stands, a weak air navigation network and emergency response at the airports.

Still things could be worse. In 2004 I flew out of Phnom Penh airport. They had an amnesty bin in which travellers could drop pocket knives or other items deemed unfit for air travel. Right there is the perspex container I saw it: an old hand grenade, found apparently by an American hippie tourist who thought it would make a great souvenir.

Imagine sitting on a plane next to that guy!

The 7 star safety assessment criteria for all airlines is as follows

Is the airline IOSA certified? If yes two stars are awarded; if not, no star is given.
What is IOSA Certification? The IATA* Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) certification audit is an internationally recognised and accepted evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline. IOSA uses internationally recognised audit principles and is designed to conduct audits in a standardised and consistent manner. Airlines are re evaluated every two years. Registering for IOSA certification and auditing is not mandatory therefore an airline that does not have IOSA certification may have either failed the IOSA audit or alternatively chosen not to participate. *IATA (International Air Transport Association)

Is the airline on the European Union (EU) Blacklist? If no a full star is awarded; if yes then no star is given.
What is the EU Blacklist? A list of airlines banned from flying into European airspace due to safety concerns arising from alleged poor aircraft maintenance and/or regulatory oversight. Airlines banned by the EU may have a flawless safety record however the potential risk towards passenger safety is deemed by the EU as too high and a ban is put in place

Has the airline maintained a fatality free record for the past 10 years? If yes the airline are awarded a full star; if not then no star is given.
A fatality is deemed as the death of crew and/or passengers whilst on board the aircraft due to an accident. If deaths occurred through acts of terrorism or highjackings they have not been included. If an airline suffered a fatal accident through no fault of their own such as a runway incursion on the active runway (an incident where an unauthorized aircraft, vehicle or person is on a runway) this has also not been included.

Is the airline FAA endorsed? If yes a full star is awarded; if not, no star is given.
What is FAA endorsement? In the United States, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has a list that bans countries (not airlines) from flying into American Airspace. The ban arises from a deemed inability to adhere to international aviation standards for aircraft operations and maintenance. According to the FAA Web site, “those that do not meet these international standards cannot initiate new service and are restricted to current levels of any existing service to the United States while corrective actions are underway.” An airline or airlines from a prohibited country may have a flawless safety record however the potential risk to safety is deemed too high by the FAA to allow operations in American airspace.

Does the country of airline origin meet all 8 ICAO safety parameters? If yes TWO stars are awarded to the airline. However, if the one criteria that is below the average is so by less than 15 per cent it is considered a pass. If 5 to 7 of the criteria are met one star is awarded. If the country only meets up to four criteria no star is given.
What is ICAO and what are the 8 parameters? The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) was created to promote the safe and orderly development of international civil aviation throughout the world. It sets standards and regulations necessary for aviation safety, security, efficiency and regularity, as well as for aviation environmental protection. The 8 ICAO audit parameters that pertain to safety are; Legislation, Organization, Licensing, Operations, Airworthiness, Accident Investigation, Air Navigation Service and Aerodromes. For more information on a particular country visit: http://www.icao.int/safety/Pages/USOAP-Results.aspx.

Has the airline’s fleet been grounded by the country’s governing aviation safety authority due to safety concerns? If yes an additional star will be taken off the total for five years from the time of grounding

Does the airline operate only Russian built aircraft? If yes an additional star will be taken off the total.
– See more at: http://www.airlineratings.com/safety_rating_per_airline.php?l=C#sthash.AUhiB4NW.dpuf

Breaking the rice pot – a Cambodian proverb

Cambodians have hundreds - perhaps thousands of proverbs.

Cambodians have hundreds – perhaps thousands of proverbs.

One of the more vibrant Facebook sites  dedicated to things Cambodia  is the group run by expats from around the world – who dwell in Cambodia. Each day the site is populated by a wide variety of comments.  There are the unfailingly  generous  comments from the Rosy guesthouse, and the help wanted  requests  from expats who are finding it hard  to locate  a house to rent, or a hairdresser  who is used to working with the mysteries of European hair.

This week one of the stories that unfolded concerned a Samsung Galaxy notepad  that had been stolen.  Unfortunately for the thief, the photos they took –  as proud new “owners”  of the device –  ended up  hosted  not on the device,  but in the Cloud, and could be accessed by the victim of the theft.

The photos were selfies, and the thief  wasn’t simply anonymous,  a desperate youth,  but an easily recognisable  disabled person. Caught on camera! I gather it took  only 48 hours or less  for the Samsung device to be recovered.

What hurt was  that the thief  had been supported (with food and shelter,) over previous months  by the victim. The English proverb  comes to mind;  ” don’t bite the hand that feeds you.”

Cambodia has more than its fair share of proverbs as well,  and the proverb  copied above reads something like this:

Taking the opportunity to embezzle from those who help you, through the use of cheap, disgraceful tricks, thinking they are unaware of attempts to cheat them – this is breaking your own rice pot.

Judging by comments  posted on Facebook,  the owner of the Samsung device has been far from alone in their experience.  Others attest to the fact that they too have been ripped off by people they had previously helped.

I’m not saying dishonesty is especially widespread in Cambodia, (the first time I was there  a stranger tapped me on the shoulder and pointed out that my wallet was half out of my back pocket, and was at risk,) but l have often wondered  at the immense temptation that many people face. A lifetime is spent scratching for dollars, and  there, within easy reach  is a laptop, or tablet,  or wad of cash – it must surely cross anyone’s mind  that one quick snatch  might be life changing.

Savong and I have discussed this a few times,  and the issue of forgiveness comes up. I’m afraid  that if he caught a thief  he would be less forgiving than I would. Or perhaps simply less soft.  I searched Google  for Cambodian proverbs about the subject of forgiveness,  but so far  I have not found anything quite so elegant as the old European  adage: “To err is human.  To forgive – divine.”

Instead  I see more Cambodian proverbs instructing owners to be careful with their goods, and instructing servants  to avoid the penalties  that come with dishonesty.  Here are two such proverbs:

Stealing may bring profit, but hanging costs far more.

Don’t let an angry man wash dishes; don’t let a hungry man guard rice.

Search Terms that have led you to this Savong School Blog

Search Terms that have led you to this Savong School Blog

This blog has been going for a while so I thought I’d investigate what search terms have led visitors to this site. A handy word cloud reveals all: a lot of people are trying to find out when on earth Cambodians celebrate their many holidays! Good question: the 2016 holidays are posted right here. While you’re here, you are welcome to click the FOLLOW button and to learn more about our school project and about the culture and life in Cambodia. Good to meet you!